Young people don’t blog

Share

For my Project 52 post, I thought I’d comment about a recent Pew report has come to my attention via DownloadSquad that says that young people are blogging less:

Pew Internet released a report yesterday called Social Media and Young Adults that shows teen blogging down by 50% over the past four years, even as blogging increased among those over 30 years old.

The report also shows that teens are not very likely to be Twitter users (only 8% of internet users between the ages of 12 and 17 report using the service), even though they are heavy users of almost all other online applications; in fact, 73% of “wired American teens” are social networking website users. Twitter seems to stick out as a service that younger people are not as interested in.

The report is really talking about teens – 12 to 17 year olds – and I have to say that the conclusions follow my observations. While I grew up before the Internet and social networks became ubiquitous, I remember MSN and ICQ were used widely. With Facebook and MySpace (and their in-house chats), it seems to me that most young people are more interested in talking with each other.

DownloadSquad also concludes that young people aren’t “content creators”. I’m not sure I agree with that. Rather, I think young people only share their content – photos and videos – with their friends, rather than putting them on Flickr or a blog.

Tags: , , ,

2 Responses to “Young people don’t blog”

  1. I'd be surprised if these findings didn't also apply to older people who used to blog. Two years ago I used to blog for my friends an family a lot more than I do now – because facebook is easier and more effective at achieving the same thing.

  2. It's true – I think a lot of people give up blogging (or tweeting) because no one is reading their posts. At least with Facebook, you know your content is being “pushed” to your friends.

Get in touch

Powered by WordPress. Designed by WooThemes

Read previous post:
Highrise unions?

Just found an interesting post by Eric Lee suggesting that union organisers use the CRM (customer relationship management) tool Highrise:...

Close